In this episode of the podcast, DLS co-founder Katy Derbyshire introduces us to daring German writer Irmgard Keun. As an ingenue, Irmgard’s writing debut was much more consequent than her acting debut, and she garnered praise and a film adaptation. Her books explored women’s lives in Weimar-era Berlin with a... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-20
By Dead Ladies Show Podcast
In which we are joined by the great Liv and Kate ('Just Watch Me' podcast) to talk about Margaret Atwood's 1996 historical fiction novel, Alias Grace. We discuss Atwood's use of fiction and history, the novel's purpose, Victorian perceptions of women and crime, and much more! Patrick's opinion is majorly... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-20
By Patrick Aura
Australian Rules Football and the earliest clubs formed to compete, are said to be the oldest established football clubs in the world.  Started in the late 1850s, initially based loosely on the Rugby School game, within 20 years it had evolved to become the basis of Australia’s very own, different... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-20
By Australian History retold by AHP
In 1908, in the middle of the Siberian wilderness, near the Tunguska River, an explosion took place which was equivalent in size to the detonation of a 5 megaton nuclear bomb.  But it wasn’t a nuclear bomb. Such things didn’t even exist then. It was a mystery that scientists are... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-20
By Gary Arndt
The Commander of the Continental Army leaves for Philadelphia in December 1778 to confer with Congress.  His plans to stay for only a few days drags into well over a month as events keep him occupied in the city. Visit my site at https://blog.AmRevPodcast.com for more text, pictures, maps, and sources on... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-20
By Michael Troy
This week we are talking about the famous animal stories of Edinburghs history.2 elephants, Greyfriars Bobby, Wojtek the Bear and Brigadier Sir Nils Olav III.http://scothistorypod.comscothistorypod@gmail.comhttp://patreon.com/scothistorypod See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-20
By Owen Innes
We talk some more about nets! This time it's bag nets and set trap nets as well as some cool info on the extinct upokororo, the NZ grayling!Here are some ways you can support HANZ!Become a Patron!https://www.patreon.com/historyaotearoaBuy some merch!https://teespring.com/stores/hanz-podcast★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-20
In April 1942 Denis Barnham flew his Spitfire off the deck of an aircraft carrier and headed for Malta, where the air battle over the island was at its most intense. This brilliant account of his time on the island offers a compelling and honest account of the terror of... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-20
By Goalhanger Films
Check out the podcast website Check out Pax Britannica Merch! Facebook | Twitter | Patreon | Donate Listen to Wittenberg to Westphalia: https://pod.link/1035044409 For this episode, I found the following publications particularly useful: Kishlansky, M, Monarchy Transformed Macinnes, Allan, The British Revolution, 1629-1660 Harris, T. Rebellion Michael J. Braddick. The... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-20
Source: Pax Britannica
By Samuel Hume
Sources:Bergreen, Laurence. Over the Edge of the World: Magellan's Terrifying Circumnavigation of the Globe. William Morrow, an Imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, 2019. Gallup-Diaz, Ignacio. “Ferdinand Magellan, ‘Our One True Guide’: The First Circumnavigation of the Globe.” Penn Museum’s Great Voyages. Penn Museum’s Great Voyages, 6 Nov. 2013, Philadelphia, PA. Herrmann, Paul, and Arnold... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-19
Source: HistoryBoiz
Support the podcast on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/vinlandtovolgaPlease make a one-off donation via PayPal: http://paypal.me/vinlandtovolga or Buymeacoffee https://www.buymeacoffee.com/vinlandtovolgaPlease follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/VinlandToVolgaPlease join the community discord server: https://discord.gg/DPKDwEgbVEmail me at volgatovinland@gmail.comSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/vinlandtovolga)... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-19
By Henry
Born on the reserve named for her ancestor Poundmaker, Jean Cuthand Goodwill would become one of the leading advocates for Indigenous health in Canada. Throughout her life she would devote herself to helping the Indigenous and improving the quality of life among their populations.  Support: www.patreon.com/canadaehx Donate: www.canadaehx.com E-mail: craig@canadaehx.com... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-19
By Craig Baird
Winter 1649The men who executed the King struggled to define the new political world they've created.... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-19
By Greg Koabel
This episode completes the recap of Season 6 by covering the years 1862-1878. In that time, reforms brought some greater prosperity to Bulgaria but ultimately failed to do nearly enough. Bulgarian revolutionaries organized and began sending armed bands into the territory, culminating in the disastrous April Uprising. Heroes like Vasil... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-19
By Eric Halsey
Political parties - we either love them or hate them. But where exactly did they come from? All of the founding fathers tended agree on one thing: factions were not a good thing for the country. But as I explore in this episode, the very men who were adamantly opposed... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-19
Source: Civics & Coffee
By Alycia
A special guest dives into how the ancient Roman economy worked, and what lead to it's near collapse in the Crisis of the Third Century. The post Why Did The Roman Economy Fail In The Third Century? | 251AD-260AD appeared first on TGNR.... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-19
By Paul K. DiCostanzo, Patrick Foote
Tom Favia served with the USMLM, The US Military Liaison Mission which the Soviet Union permitted to operate in East Germany at the end of World War 2 for the purposes of monitoring and furthering better relationships between the Soviet and Western occupation forces. The British & French also had... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-18
By Ian Sanders & Tim Favia
The infamous Koh-I-Noor diamond currently sits in the Tower of London among the crown jewels of the British monarchy, but its bloody, eon-spanning journey began in the riverbeds of ancient India. Cut, coveted, and stolen multiple times over, this is the story of the world’s most controversial gem. Told through... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-18
By Evergreen Podcasts
Did you really thing I’d leave you without content for two weeks in the middle of a season?!?  Special Patreon Release… I’ll leave this one up for one week, and it was one of our best chats yet! Dr. Shari Valencic explains the “Culture of Honor,” and how it might... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-18
By Zachary DeBacco
Do you know that June 19th is known as the Day of Freedom? And it's also our podaversary?  Yep, June 19th, also called Juneteenth,  is actually the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States. In this quick 25-minute episode find out why General Granger's arrival... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-18
In this episode, I cover the background and rise of perhaps the most infamous political party in world history, the Nazis. How were they able to gain power? Who was Adolf HitIer? I will answer these and more. In part 1, I will begin at the origins of hate in... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-18
By Matthew Motes
A doctor, decorated First World War veteran and a former Liberal turned Conservative, Dr. Robert Manion was respected for his intelligence and fiery House of Commons speeches. Serving as party leader from 1938 to 1940, he led the party into the Second World War. Upon his death, his rival, William... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-18
By Craig Baird
"This is Today" features the stories that make this day unique. It’s Friday, June 18, 2021, and here is what we talk about today:Federal Holiday: JuneteenthInternational Sushi Day National Go Fishing Day International Panic Day National Splurge DayCharles I Susan B. AnthonyFinest HourFire PhoneHelp to support this podcast:Become a Patron!This post was... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-18
Source: This is Today
By X Audio Podcasts
The Persian Empire had launched its first invasion against Greece in 492 BC after their involvement in the Ionian revolt. The campaign that came across the Aegean Sea would fall short of capturing Athens in 490 BC at the Bay of Marathon, seeing the invaders withdraw back into the empire.... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-18
By Mark Selleck
Haiti is located on the island of Hispaniola in the Greater Antilles of the Caribbean Sea.  It is east of Cuba and Jamaica, and south of the Bahamas, and it has a very interesting history.  It was originally inhabited by an indigenous population that migrated from South America before the... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-18
By Brenda Ganske
In the first of two stories about sole survivors of shipwrecks, it's November 1930 and a man stumbles soaking wet into a post office on the coast at Weston-Super-Mare. When he recovers he has quite a story of remarkable survival. Come and see Charlie telling stories in Canterbury:https://www.waterstones.com/events/the-channel/canterbury-rose-laneBuy Coastal Stories a... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-18
Source: Coastal Stories
By Charlie Connelly
The Bloomsbury Set embraced a new culture where sexual equality and freedoms were not only practiced but celebrated. They searched for definitions of the good, true, and beautiful. They supported sexual equality and freedom, informality and fierce intellectual debate. All largely at odds with their strict Victorian upbringings. Hear your... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-17
Source: London History
By LondonGuidedWalks.co.uk
I’m finally making my return to podcasting with an episode that breaks my starting rule (to not talk about women in 1790s Philadelphia) by talking about women in 1790s Philadelphia! Interested in learning about some of the female tradespeople behind Martha Washington’s fashion as First Lady? Take a listen to... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-17
Source: Works Not Cited
By Tessa Payer
The official Best Picture winner of 1932-33! We've had a lot of good ones this season - ones we've heard of and are still watched. Cavalcade is less known. It was interesting to see what came out on top compared to Little Women, 42nd Street, A Farewell to Arms, I... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-17
By Jason and Laura
Subtitle: How Harriet Tubman could change your perspective on who belongs outdoorsEpisode description: You probably learned about Harriet Tubman in school growing up — how she led slaves to freedom on the underground railroad. But she was a lot more than an activist and freedom fighter. She was a daughter,... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-17
Juneteenth is annual holiday celebrating the emancipation of those who had been enslaved in the United States, its a mix of June and Nineteenth, Originating in Galveston, Texas, it is now celebrated annually on June 19 throughout the United States, with increasing official recognition. It is commemorated on the anniversary... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-17
By Countryboi
We are SO EXCITED to announce that, in honor of the Two Year Anniversary of the Hashtag History podcast, we will be hosting our first ever LIVE show via ZOOM! It will take place on Saturday, July 24th at 4:00 PM PST.  We will have a LIVE cocktail segment that... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-17
Source: Hashtag History
By Hashtag History
We asked you to ask us questions, and (some of) you sure did! Plus, Ed tests to see if Phil has been paying attention in the CTDEA Big Fat Quiz of the Year...and a half. Support us on Patreon at patreon.com/ctdeapod. Contact us at ctdeapod@gmail.com or at our website: ctdeapod.com. ... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-17
By CTDEA Team
A closer look at the phenomenon of banditry in the Jinggang Mountains, because of the importance that banditry and other forms of collective violence had on how the revolutionary movement developed.Further reading:Stephen Averill, Revolution in the Highlands: China’s Jinggangshan Base AreaNames from this episode:Qu Qiubai, Named head of new provisional... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-17
By Matthew Rothwell
It's the OG of experimental literature! (In English, anyway...) In this episode, Jacke takes a look at the wild and woolly Tristram Shandy by Laurence Sterne. And in spite of Dr. Johnson's famous claim that "nothing odd will do long - Tristram Shandy did not last!" we're still talking about... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-17
By Jacke Wilson / The Podglomerate
Akita, George, Brandon Palmer. The Japanese Colonial Legacy in Korea, 1910-1945. Maine: MerwinAsia, 2015 Carlson, Lewis. Remembered Prisoners of a Forgotten War. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2002. Chamberlin, Paul Thomas. The Cold War's Killing Fields. New York: Harper, 2018. Cleaver, Thomas. MiG Alley. Oxford: Osprey Publishing, 2019. Cumings, Bruce. Korea's Place in the... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-17
By Trevor Owens
Em este nuevo episodio exploramos el mito acerca de la muerte de Balder el hijo mas amado de Odín, dios de la luz, su muerte tiñó de sombra la soleada Asgard y es considerado como uno de los desencadenantes del Ragnarok, el crepúsculo de los dioses, además de que nos... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-16
Source: Mitos y más
By David García
In this episode Anne Marie talks  to La Percée du Bocage museum president, Billy Leblond and Men in the Shed Blogger, Colin Foster about Operation Bluecoat and the story behind Men in the Shed. Men in the Shed tells the story of 18 Allied POWs who literally left their mark... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-16
By Billy Leblond, Colin Foster
Cleopatra’s dad did something really impressive for a Ptolemaic pharaoh, he managed to die of old age! However, his reign had is challenges. In this episode, we cover Cleopatra’s early life and her dad’s reign. So grab some wine (T12 would approve) and get ready to meet the Romans, make... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-16
By Madeleine Smith
Reconstructing Music. Michael Levy is a renowned composer for ancient instruments and music. Using replicas of artefacts, and taking inspiration from texts and art, Michael creates wonderful songs based in the ancient styles. Michael sat down with the podcast to discuss his recent works, including his wonderful albums of ancient... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-16
By Dominic Perry
After the fall of Nanking, there was still no end in sight for the fighting in China.... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-16
By Wesley Livesay
For much of royal history, Kings literally ruled. And a King’s primary job description was to ensure peace and prosperity at home, protect against enemies abroad, and secure the succession. Be a judge, be a soldier, be a dad. A King’s success was typically judged against these criteria, at least... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-16
By Carol Ann Lloyd
Imagine you were a woman born at the height of the Gilded Age with a passion, not for fashion or society, but for sports. And you grew up riding bareback and driving massive horse-drawn carriages through the narrow streets of Chinatown. Your family's wealth meant you could also sail on... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-15
By Long Island History Project
Zheng He & Co. have left the station and are sailing out! They leave the safety of the Yangtze River and set their compasses southbound and down, first to Fujian, then to Vietnam, Java, Sri Lanka, and finally all the way to India, all in the name of trade and... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-15
By Chris Stewart
The Lonely Palette is collaborating with the Addison Gallery of American Art in celebration of the museum's 90th anniversary! In this episode, we're using the Addison's collection to explore the American city in the same way that art history has been looking at landscape since time immemorial: what it represents,... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-15
By Tamar Avishai
Welcome back to Extra AF where we dive into what happened this month in history and what happened this month that made history. And of course, we read your emails! This month we discover a pagan tomb and discuss whether the Loch Ness Monster is really a Whale's Willy. Then,... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-15
By historicalafpod
Welcome to a brand new episode of Stories That Made Us! This week we conclude the wonderful tale of the great Algonquian hero – Nanabozho, which we began in the previous episode. Keen listeners and old followers of the podcast would remember Nanabozho – for he played a grand role... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-15
By Stories That Made Us
The date is April 1683. The Rye House Plot, an attempt to assassinate Charles, has been foiled, causing a wave of support for the King. A celebrity magazine goes to interview Charles.  The Lost Tapes of History was created and written by Kerrie Fuller. Charles II: Rob Firth - www.spotlight.com/6211-3492-0602... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-15
By Since79 Productions
In this episode we spend a bit of quality time with our friend Marc Boch and discuss why he thought what he thought about slavery and serfdom, why some of it was wrong, and why some of it is still valid. This is a nice, calm episode. Some gentle laughs... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-15
By Benjamin Jacobs
In this episode of Accessible Art History: The Podcast, I'm discussing one of the most romantic works in art history: The Kiss by Gustav Klimt For images and sources:  https://www.accessiblearthistory.com/post/podcast-episode-42-the-kiss-by-gustav-klimt  --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/accessiblearthistory/support... Read more
Published on: 2021-06-14
By Accessible Art History